Tag Archive | twitter

Interview with Larry Myler: Engaging via Twitter

@LarryMyler

Larry Myler is the founder and CEO of By Monday, Inc., a consulting firm that specializes in making strategy work in the real world. He is an entrepreneur with seven start-ups under his belt. Over the course of his 33-year career, Myler has helped others improve their businesses by consulting and training for leadership teams and employees in interpersonal communication, profit enhancement, organizational efficiency, survey research, and more. Past clients include AT&T, Shell Oil, Lockheed Martin, and Ford Motor Company. Myler holds an MBA (with international emphasis). He is also the author of Wiley title, Indispensable By Monday a book about what makes an employee indispensable.

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WriteForWiley: Greetings Larry, thanks for joining us. We really enjoyed your December Forbes article on self-promotion and digital marketing; we’re excited to further tap into your expertise, specifically regarding Twitter. Let’s start at the beginning, when did you join Twitter and why?

Larry Myler: I joined Twitter on September 8, 2009, because I wanted to increase my social media presence and reach out to people to share thoughts on business strategy.

When you started using Twitter what were some of your goals? Have those goals changed? 

Larry: One of my goals was to transmit information about my blog at forbes.com called “There’s A Strategy for That.” I’m still learning a lot about Twitter and recently have started taking advantage of Twitter as a networking tool. It’s a lot less structured than LinkedIn, but it’s amazing how accessible people are on Twitter.

How do you define Twitter? 

Larry: I suspect Twitter has different meanings for people depending on how they use it, but for me Twitter is a virtual casual encounter. In business, we have all had occasion to transact business or get a foot in the door because of a casual acquaintance. With Twitter, we can experience that chance meeting with people all over the world.

Describe your process for generating content. Do you have any guidelines for a target number of tweets per day?

Larry: No. I’ve been told that the most important thing about getting followers is, “Don’t be boring.” If I forced a certain number of Tweets each day, I’m sure that would be boring.

I have some basic content set up to post automatically, and beyond that I tweet when something I’m doing seems “not boring.” It’s taking me a while to get into the habit. There was no Twitter for most of my life, so it does not always occur to me to Tweet things. It’s a learning process.

My Twitter goal for 2014 is to Tweet more at live events. So, stay tuned!

What is the greatest Twitter accomplishment?

Larry: Twitter is instantaneous. It isn’t always accurate, but it is fast. The right content with the right hash-tag can touch thousands of people within minutes. That is powerful.

What are the least successful campaigns/Tweets?  What did you learn from these less-successful endeavors?

Larry: As I said above, being boring is a “FailWhale.” If I want folks to read my forbes.com blog, or respond to me, my Tweet has to be interesting, offer them something they want to learn more about. I’m not sure how sexy I can make business strategy, but I try.

We haven’t yet tried to initiate a Twitter Trend, but our company’s new app is almost ready to beta test, so maybe we can do something with that.

How do you measure follower engagement?

Larry: I like to get @replies. Many people I follow have automated messages. Those are fine, I use them too. But an @reply is almost always an original Tweet. When I get those, I try to respond pretty quickly.

I also like to see my Tweets favorited, especially if it links to my blog. That means they are going to read it, and are saving the link for when they have time.

If I Tweet out a link to a new article, and it gets favorites and @replies, I know I’ve struck a chord. Definitely “not boring.”

Has social media influenced your business?

Larry: It is all-encompassing. We use social media. Our vendors use it. Our customers use it. Our customers’ employees use it. Social media is to business today what the telephone was to business in the early 20th century.

Overall, do you think Twitter changed the way business is done?

Larry: No. Business is still a value exchange. Twitter doesn’t change that. But Twitter makes the world smaller so we can do business without borders and boundaries.

Often authors find it hard to balance personal accounts and a professional brand.  Does the line between @LarryMyler and @ByMonday ever blur? How do you separate personal from business?

Larry: There is a lot of blurring since @ByMonday is my business and the content for ByMonday basically comes from me too. But @LarryMyler is a lot less boring than @ByMonday. I can tell because I have more followers!

Do you have any dos and don’ts of Twitter?

Larry: Do Tweet live events. Do Tweet personal as well as professional posts. Do be positive, hopeful and optimistic. Don’t be boring, critical, negative, or political. Actually, most of that speaks to the dos and don’ts of communication in business generally.

Who are you following?

Larry: I actually follow quite a few people. Mostly they are business professionals, editors and writers, academics, and entrepreneurs.

Do you use any Twitter apps or add-ons? 

Larry: Yes I use Tweetadder.

What tools do you find to be the most helpful?

Larry: The automated posting of links to articles is very helpful. Twitter users do not sit around watching their Timelines. They check them off and on during the day, so if I want my followers to see my Tweets, I have to transmit them more than once at different times.

What advice do you have for authors who would like to get started in the Twitter game?

Larry: Writers write. Tweeters Tweet. If you’re going to sign up, follow some people and accounts that appeal to you personally as well as professionally. And Tweet.

Can you recommend some informative books or sites that helped you in the process?

Larry: Most of what I know about Twitter I learned from my admin. I don’t think she’s written a book.

What do you think is the next big thing in social media? 

Larry: I have no clue. Many new social media endeavors are flashes and then disappear, which is why Twitter is so impressive. My CIO said three years ago that the tech world was predicting a decline in Twitter use. It hasn’t happened.

Do you have anything you’d like to add?

Larry: Yes. More followers!

Twitter-Powered Vending Machine

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Twitter activating vending machine from Bos Ice Tea

Craving a vending machine goodie but out of cash? – No fear! The social media-powered vending machine is here.

On Thursday, Canadian telecommunications company Telus made headlines after placing a panda stuffed vending machine in a Vancouver mall. For every shopper who tweeted #HomeTweetHome, Telus donated $1 to WWF Canada, the conservation group, while dispensing a stuffed panda.  This whole project was captured on video

Other companies have participated in similar endeavors. In 2012, Pepsi unveiled a machine in the United States that distributed free drinks to fans who “liked” the brand on Facebook. The same year, South African company BOS Ice Tea unveiled the world’s first twitter-activated vending machine at Wembley Square in Cape Town. The machine issued samples of the Rooibos-based beverage to all who tweeted in the vicinity of the machine.

The companies’ creative take on Hashtag interaction reduces the ambiguity associated with measuring the effectiveness of social media campaigns.

Something to ponder:  Do these innovative examples of Hashtag engagement have you thinking outside of the box?

Link: Mashable’s 5 Biggest Social Media Lessons of 2013

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[image from techwhyse.com]

As 2013 comes to a close it’s a perfect time to reflect on the hits and misses of a year nearly passed. Mashable’s “5 Biggest Social Media Lessons of 2013” succinctly categorizes worldwide social media events into intriguing yet practical lessons.

From Oreo’s growth in popularity through advantageous use of the Super Bowl blackout to an Associated Press’ Twitter hack that lead to market-wide panic, this summary of the year’s successes and failures serves as an intriguing and teachable blueprint for the coming year.

The major lessons are:

  • “Social Media Can Move Markets”: Even a simple Twitter account hack can lead to stock market panic. Suddenly, previously separate entities seem interconnected.
  • “Social Media Is Increasingly Visual”: Vine and Instagram Video were introduced, allowing users to create and share short videos with ease.
  • “Social Media Isn’t Just for the Kids”: LinkedIn Influencers became a platform for CEOs to interact with members and more high-ranking global leaders joined Twitter.
  • “Social Media Advertising Is Growing, Evolving”: More revenue and influence comes from Tweets, mobile ads, and sponsored posts.
  • “Social Media Could Be TV’s Best Ally”: Related to the point above, high rates of live-tweets during television programs represent more user-engagement.

As the post focuses on emerging trends, global successes and pitfalls to avoid in the future, we wonder: what will the next year bring? What will be the next social media trend? How will the internet react to world events and how can we take part in the process?

“It’s not who you know, but who could you know.”

With political scandal on Twitter and cultural revolution on Facebook,  familiar concepts are redefined in “The Digital Age.” The resounding influence of social media is testament to the endless possibilities at our fingertips, substantive exemplars of an expansive and burgeoning array of new media.

Earlier this year Clay Shirkyinternet expert and author of Here Comes Everybody: The Power of Organizing Without Organizations , was featured on an episode of The Freakonomics Podcast called “Who Runs the Internet?

In this podcast, Shirky says, “60 percent of adults around the world are now connected to the same communications grid.” That’s roughly 3 billion connections around the world. The potential network of connections is astonishing and daunting. With some helpful guidance, even the most resisting Luddite can reap the benefits of expanding your contacts. 

So next time you are at a networking event, look around and think, “Who could I know?” Your next best professional connection could be standing by, ready to link up.

Best Twitter Accounts of 2013

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As the year comes to a close, many websites released their Best Twitter Accounts of 2013. These lists include authors, comedians, musicians. brands, and actors. 

Here are some lists of note:

With the New Year coming up, there is no better time to dive into the world of Twitter.  

As you browse through the feeds, keep in mind the singular voice of these personalities.  Also take notice how they retweet and share links. Keep in mind how some use images, videos, and .gifs to reach their audience and convey their message. These multimedia tools are very powerful if used in the correct way.

Read an interview with Gary Vaynerchuk and learn how to engage “5-minutes-more”

In this week’s technology section, NY Times profiled Gary Vaynerchuk.  Gary Vaynerchuk, of VaynerMedia, is a social media marketer and “self-promoter.”

He frequently uses Twitter to connect with current and prospective clients.  According to the interview, he challenged himself to publish 70 Tweets per day and accomplishes this by combining both response tweets and original musings.  Vaynerchuk also planned to interview 365 people in 365 days and post 3 essays per week on Medium.

These types of activities expose Vaynerchuk’s brand and company to a wide variety of ears.

Click here to view a slideshow that goes along with the profile.  Within these pictures, you can follow Vaynerchuk through his 16-hour day. constantly engaging with employees, clients, and others.

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With the workload of one’s university, research institution, or employer, it may seem impossible to follow Vaynerchuk’s lead.  But there may be a few small things you can do.

For example, try to spend a few minutes doing a little bit more.

Spend a few more minutes engaging with your Twitter followers.  Compose some tweets that mention colleagues.

Spend a few more minutes browsing through Hashtags: Vaynerchuk often uses Hashtags to find his audience so you can do the same.  Search for popular hashtags related to your Tweets and add them in.  Become familiar with how Hashtags are formatted.  This will help in the long run.

Spend a few more minutes talking to others.  Vaynerchuk decided to interview “anyone who asked.” Participate in a 5-minute conversation with someone new. Whether this person is a social media/technology-minded individual, a colleague from another department, or just a familiar person you see during your daily commute, you can always learn something new from those around you.  Every person enters a conversation with a different set of experiences and social constructs.  Talking to these unfamiliar individuals may expose you to a novel idea for self-promotion that you were unaware of.

Link: NYT on Twitter for the Twitter Illiterate

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New York Times has some very informative tech articles for all levels of expertise.

This week, read an article entitled “Twitter Illiterate? Mastering the @BC’s.” Tech writer Hanna Ingber (@HannaIngber) shares some tips to follow when you start a Twitter account.

The article is broken into 7 sections:

  1. Set up an account
  2. Build a community
  3. Learn the language
  4. Understand the symbols
  5. Tweet like a person
  6. Organize your feed
  7. Tell others

It is very easy to understand and Ingber offers explanations and examples along the way.

Be sure to read the full article, linked above.  There are many helpful tips and some links to prominent feeds like  @CoryBooker, the New Jersey Senator and Newark Mayor who is well-known for connecting with constituents via social media.