Tag Archive | reviews

Wiley pilots transferable peer review

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Quiz time! How long would you estimate it takes for a paper to go through peer review?

On average, it takes 80 days per paper or 1,920 hours (according to an article by M. Ware in Publishing Research Consortium). That’s a lot of time spent waiting for a decision. In hopes to alievating this pain point, Wiley is piloting “transferable peer review.” As outlined in a  recent Wiley Exchanges article, this new system will cut down on review time.

Here are a few of the main points:

  • The system allows you the option to preserve and transfer initial peer review, should you receive a decision to reject from one journal and wish to request transfer to another.
  • The review is now able to travel with the article on its route to publication. By reducing the number of reviews in the universe, the aim is to reduce the burden on reviewers, while helping editors to make faster decisions and increase the publication speed.

There are initiatives to take some journals out of the peer review process altogether and detach reviewer reports from publication in a specific journal. Many authors know which journals they would prefer to publish and would rather not be told which journal they should submit. Many authors do not want undesirable journals to bid for publication of their paper.

The system is currently been piloted among nine of our high impact neuroscience titles  and will run for about six months. The results will be used to develop a new process. 

For more information, check out the full article visit the Wiley Exchanges page here.

You can subscribe to Wiley Exchanges updates via email or RSS feed or follow Exchanges on Twitter.

Hedley Rees shares his thoughts on the biggest issue facing authors

[The following post was written by Hedley Rees, an author with over 35 years of experience in the industry.   Click here to read more, including his Take Note and Promote interview] 

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Occasionally I’m asked about the biggest issue I faced in writing my book. As I think back now, writing the book turned out to be the easy part; by far, the most difficult piece was getting people interested in buying the book.

Soon after publication, I realized the book was not exactly flying off the shelves. Global monthly sales were barely reaching double figures. So I conferred with two established authors in my network (both with 45 books to their name) and their message was unanimous – I had to get the word out there for myself. Publishers have too much going on to focus on individual authors, especially new and unknown ones.

I started to think about what they had said. True, I was unknown (even the people who knew me well, they didn’t know my competence as an author worthy of risking a significant investment in my product). As I pondered other possible issues, I realized my subject area (supply chain management) was in its infancy in pharmaceuticals and life sciences (my target market). Hence, the book was never even considered by prospective purchasers. That meant not only did I have to grow the market for the contents of my book, I had to raise awareness levels of the subject matter in an entire industry sector.

I’ve been climbing these particular mountains ever since. Now some two years plus into the ascent, I have learned a lot. In terms of getting over the first peak, I have leaned heavily on getting reviews from respected experts. This entailed a significant amount of work through my contact network and continual following up by email. I have inventoried all the reviews into a pdf which I can attach to LinkedIn status updates, twitter and emails. In the end, the effort was certainly worth it.

As for the second obstruction, it is still a work in progress. I have been fortunate in one sense. As I have been preaching the importance of supply chain management in pharmaceuticals, the issues in the pharma supply chain have gained prominence even up to congressional level and through to the President of the United States himself. Maybe I should send a copy to the White House!

Hedley Rees
August 2, 2013

How does amazon.co.jp’s search work?

amazon.jp search

When a customer conducts a search on Amazon.co.jp, search results are returned using algorithms which generate a list of books relevant to the search term and then rank those books according to sales ranking (based on total units sold) and availability.

Search Inside the Book Wiley submit as many books as possible for participation in amazon’s Search Inside the Book programme. Participation means when a customer conducts a search on amazon, the search engine searches Amazon’s entire database of Search Inside the Book content to return results based not only on title and bibliographic ‘hits’ but also on ‘hits’ generated by key phrases within a book’s text and table of contents. Research by Amazon has proved a positive correlation between books participating in Search Inside and increased sales.

How can I help to grow sales of my book on amazon.co.jp?

Comment on your own book on Amazon.co.jp On your book’s product page on Amazon.co.jp is a ‘Feedback’ section which includes a link to ‘Author Comments’. This is your opportunity to tell amazon.co.jp’s customer’s about your book in your own words. Use this section to tell customers what your book’s product description doesn’t.

Customer reviews If you have colleagues or students who have read your book you could ask them to write a review of your book on amazon.co.jp using the ‘Customer Reviews’ tool. Please remember that reviews must be an honest reflection of what the reader thought of the book. Customer reviews have been proven by amazon.co.jp to increase sales.

Create Listmania lists The Listmania function on Amazon.co.jp allows experts in any given field to create a list of ‘must-read’ books for other amazon.co.jp customers. By creating a Listmania list, you can include your own book’s alongside other important book on your subject. This will increase the visibility of your books on amazon.co.jp.

Making amazon.co.uk work for you

Amazon

 How does Amazon’s search work? When a customer conducts a search on Amazon, search results are returned using algorithms which generate a list of books relevant to the search term and then rank those books according to sales ranking (based on total units sold) and availability.

“Search-Inside” the Book  Wiley submit as many books as possible for participation in Amazon’s Search Inside the Book programme. Participation means when a customer conducts a search on Amazon, the search engine searches Amazon’s entire database of Search Inside the Book content to return results based not only on title and bibliographic ‘hits’ but also on ‘hits’ generated by key phrases within a book’s text and table of contents. Research by Amazon has proved a positive correlation between books participating in Search Inside and increased sales.

How can I help to grow sales of my book on Amazon?

Comment on your own book on Amazon On your book’s product page on Amazon is a ‘Feedback’ section which includes a link to ‘I am the author, and I want to comment on this book’. This is your opportunity to tell Amazon’s customer’s about your book in your own words. Use this section to tell customers what your book’s product description doesn’t.

  • Customer reviews If you have colleagues or students who have read your book you could ask them to write a review of your book on Amazon using the ‘Customer Review’ tool. Please remember that reviews must be an honest reflection of what the reader thought of the book. Customer reviews have been proven by Amazon to increase sales.
  • Create Listmania lists The Listmania function on Amazon allows experts in any given field to create a list of ‘must-read’ books for other Amazon customers. By creating a Listmania list, you can include your own book/s alongside other important book on your subject. This will increase the visibility of your books on Amazon.
  • Creating videos/ audio content for use on Amazon Wiley are now able to submit videos for use on Amazon book product pages. On Amazon.com, Wiley have seen a positive correlation between book product pages that include a video and increased sales. Videos that work well, in terms of driving sales, are those where an author provides some tips or tricks on a subject. If you have an idea for a video which would promote your book on Amazon, please speak to your Wiley marketing team in the first instance.
  • Include your book’s title and ISBN in your email signature You can really increase your book’s visibility by including the book’s title and ISBN in your email signature, or on any other correspondence that you regularly send; letters, newsletters, blogs etc.