How to market you, and your published content

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Being interviewed by a website, magazine, or even here at the Author Blog can be a great opportunity to boost your profile, your work, and your social media accounts. But what happens after the publish? What you do next can be as important as the content itself. To ensure you get the most out of your time spent participating in an interview, we’ve narrowed it down to four easy steps: post publication promotion can be as simple as A, B, C…

Announce it! Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, WordPress, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Google +, Digg, and StumbleUpon are great ways to share your work to the masses. Easy one-click sharing via these social networking tools is available at the bottom of many websites, including the Author Blog. Use social media to your advantage.

Blog it! If you have a blog, share the interview or guest post with your readers.  Link them to the page and call out some of the major points addressed in the interview.  This will stir up interest and engage readers in what you have to say.

Comment Away! If a post has a bunch of comments, it becomes more discoverable in search engines like Google. When promoting your interview to your social media followers, suggest colleagues to leave comments and leave comments of your own.  Commenting facilitates conversation and makes it easier to engage with your audience.  You can even include your URL link in comments. It’s ok to “horn toot” a little bit!

And finally, Don’t forget to Keep in Touch! Keep in touch with your interviewer and follow up regarding additional opportunities.  There may be situations where the website may plan for a supplementary interview or guest post based on the positive feedback of your previous profile. Interviewers can be great resources as you continue to promote yourself and enlarge your audience.

Link: Google+ email changes

Mashable posted an introduction to Google+’s new default privacy settings which now allows Google+ users to email without email addresses.  Mashable summarizes the main changes which come with the new privacy default settings along with a handy “how to” manage the settings should you not wish for the increased Google+ accessibility.

Google has promised to alert users via email when they have the option to change their settings as they roll out the feature over the next few days.

As with all online platforms, take a close look at the privacy settings. Only share what you feel comfortable sharing.

Some sites frequently change their privacy settings and policies so keep in the loop with these updates.

What do you think of the the changes to Google+? Handy social media tool or breach of privacy?

Interview with Larry Myler: Engaging via Twitter

@LarryMyler

Larry Myler is the founder and CEO of By Monday, Inc., a consulting firm that specializes in making strategy work in the real world. He is an entrepreneur with seven start-ups under his belt. Over the course of his 33-year career, Myler has helped others improve their businesses by consulting and training for leadership teams and employees in interpersonal communication, profit enhancement, organizational efficiency, survey research, and more. Past clients include AT&T, Shell Oil, Lockheed Martin, and Ford Motor Company. Myler holds an MBA (with international emphasis). He is also the author of Wiley title, Indispensable By Monday a book about what makes an employee indispensable.

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WriteForWiley: Greetings Larry, thanks for joining us. We really enjoyed your December Forbes article on self-promotion and digital marketing; we’re excited to further tap into your expertise, specifically regarding Twitter. Let’s start at the beginning, when did you join Twitter and why?

Larry Myler: I joined Twitter on September 8, 2009, because I wanted to increase my social media presence and reach out to people to share thoughts on business strategy.

When you started using Twitter what were some of your goals? Have those goals changed? 

Larry: One of my goals was to transmit information about my blog at forbes.com called “There’s A Strategy for That.” I’m still learning a lot about Twitter and recently have started taking advantage of Twitter as a networking tool. It’s a lot less structured than LinkedIn, but it’s amazing how accessible people are on Twitter.

How do you define Twitter? 

Larry: I suspect Twitter has different meanings for people depending on how they use it, but for me Twitter is a virtual casual encounter. In business, we have all had occasion to transact business or get a foot in the door because of a casual acquaintance. With Twitter, we can experience that chance meeting with people all over the world.

Describe your process for generating content. Do you have any guidelines for a target number of tweets per day?

Larry: No. I’ve been told that the most important thing about getting followers is, “Don’t be boring.” If I forced a certain number of Tweets each day, I’m sure that would be boring.

I have some basic content set up to post automatically, and beyond that I tweet when something I’m doing seems “not boring.” It’s taking me a while to get into the habit. There was no Twitter for most of my life, so it does not always occur to me to Tweet things. It’s a learning process.

My Twitter goal for 2014 is to Tweet more at live events. So, stay tuned!

What is the greatest Twitter accomplishment?

Larry: Twitter is instantaneous. It isn’t always accurate, but it is fast. The right content with the right hash-tag can touch thousands of people within minutes. That is powerful.

What are the least successful campaigns/Tweets?  What did you learn from these less-successful endeavors?

Larry: As I said above, being boring is a “FailWhale.” If I want folks to read my forbes.com blog, or respond to me, my Tweet has to be interesting, offer them something they want to learn more about. I’m not sure how sexy I can make business strategy, but I try.

We haven’t yet tried to initiate a Twitter Trend, but our company’s new app is almost ready to beta test, so maybe we can do something with that.

How do you measure follower engagement?

Larry: I like to get @replies. Many people I follow have automated messages. Those are fine, I use them too. But an @reply is almost always an original Tweet. When I get those, I try to respond pretty quickly.

I also like to see my Tweets favorited, especially if it links to my blog. That means they are going to read it, and are saving the link for when they have time.

If I Tweet out a link to a new article, and it gets favorites and @replies, I know I’ve struck a chord. Definitely “not boring.”

Has social media influenced your business?

Larry: It is all-encompassing. We use social media. Our vendors use it. Our customers use it. Our customers’ employees use it. Social media is to business today what the telephone was to business in the early 20th century.

Overall, do you think Twitter changed the way business is done?

Larry: No. Business is still a value exchange. Twitter doesn’t change that. But Twitter makes the world smaller so we can do business without borders and boundaries.

Often authors find it hard to balance personal accounts and a professional brand.  Does the line between @LarryMyler and @ByMonday ever blur? How do you separate personal from business?

Larry: There is a lot of blurring since @ByMonday is my business and the content for ByMonday basically comes from me too. But @LarryMyler is a lot less boring than @ByMonday. I can tell because I have more followers!

Do you have any dos and don’ts of Twitter?

Larry: Do Tweet live events. Do Tweet personal as well as professional posts. Do be positive, hopeful and optimistic. Don’t be boring, critical, negative, or political. Actually, most of that speaks to the dos and don’ts of communication in business generally.

Who are you following?

Larry: I actually follow quite a few people. Mostly they are business professionals, editors and writers, academics, and entrepreneurs.

Do you use any Twitter apps or add-ons? 

Larry: Yes I use Tweetadder.

What tools do you find to be the most helpful?

Larry: The automated posting of links to articles is very helpful. Twitter users do not sit around watching their Timelines. They check them off and on during the day, so if I want my followers to see my Tweets, I have to transmit them more than once at different times.

What advice do you have for authors who would like to get started in the Twitter game?

Larry: Writers write. Tweeters Tweet. If you’re going to sign up, follow some people and accounts that appeal to you personally as well as professionally. And Tweet.

Can you recommend some informative books or sites that helped you in the process?

Larry: Most of what I know about Twitter I learned from my admin. I don’t think she’s written a book.

What do you think is the next big thing in social media? 

Larry: I have no clue. Many new social media endeavors are flashes and then disappear, which is why Twitter is so impressive. My CIO said three years ago that the tech world was predicting a decline in Twitter use. It hasn’t happened.

Do you have anything you’d like to add?

Larry: Yes. More followers!

Facebook Acquires Branch Media

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Facebook has acquired conversation service Branch Media and subsidiary Potluck, as of Monday January 13th. Josh Miller, Branch CEO, announced the buyout via Facebook.

In an article Miller posted last year on Medium.com, the now 23-year-old Branch CEO forecasted, “Facebook may have an irreversibly bad brand.” Miller will now be part of turning things around for the social media networking service, “After two years building Branch and Potluck, I am thrilled to announce we will be continuing our mission at Facebook!” Branch is to expand to Facebook scale, starting a Facebook ‘conversations’ unit aimed at promoting interest based interaction between users. The project is part of an overall Facebook initiative aimed at generating a more refined dialogue and supporting a News Feed composed of actual news.

Do you think “Facebook may have an irreversibly bad brand?” Is Branch just what Facebook needs? Will you stick around to see? Let us know by commenting below.

Wiley pilots transferable peer review

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Quiz time! How long would you estimate it takes for a paper to go through peer review?

On average, it takes 80 days per paper or 1,920 hours (according to an article by M. Ware in Publishing Research Consortium). That’s a lot of time spent waiting for a decision. In hopes to alievating this pain point, Wiley is piloting “transferable peer review.” As outlined in a  recent Wiley Exchanges article, this new system will cut down on review time.

Here are a few of the main points:

  • The system allows you the option to preserve and transfer initial peer review, should you receive a decision to reject from one journal and wish to request transfer to another.
  • The review is now able to travel with the article on its route to publication. By reducing the number of reviews in the universe, the aim is to reduce the burden on reviewers, while helping editors to make faster decisions and increase the publication speed.

There are initiatives to take some journals out of the peer review process altogether and detach reviewer reports from publication in a specific journal. Many authors know which journals they would prefer to publish and would rather not be told which journal they should submit. Many authors do not want undesirable journals to bid for publication of their paper.

The system is currently been piloted among nine of our high impact neuroscience titles  and will run for about six months. The results will be used to develop a new process. 

For more information, check out the full article visit the Wiley Exchanges page here.

You can subscribe to Wiley Exchanges updates via email or RSS feed or follow Exchanges on Twitter.

Wiley Author Vaclav Smil interviewed by WIRED

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Dr Vaclav Smil, professor emeritus of environment and geography at University of Manitoba (Canada) and Wiley author, was interviewed by WIRED in an article called ‘This Is the Man Bill Gates Thinks You Absolutely Should Be Reading.’

In the interview, Dr Smil discusses the problems facing the US and the rest of the world: alternative energy, innovation by Apple, the decline of American-based manufacturing… (just to name a few)… Click on the link above to read the full article from WIRED.

Dr Vaclav Smil has published in more than 30 books, over 400 papers, and contributed to more than 30 edited volumes.

Want more? Check out Dr Smil’s most recent title, Making the Modern World: Materials and Dematerialisation, out this month.

Bikramjit Basu named winner of Shanti Swarup Bhatnagar Award

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Wiley author Bikramjit Basu, was awarded 2013’s Shanti Swarup Bhatnagar (SSB) Award The Shanti Swarup Bhatnagar Prize for Science and Technology is awarded annually by the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), India, for outstanding research in subjects including the chemical sciences.

Dr Basu was honored for his work with encompassing theory and experiments to significantly enhance the understanding of in-vitro cell functionality modulation on engineered biomaterials using electric field simulation approach

Bikramjit Basu, PhD, is an associate professor in the Department of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering at the Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur. His research interests include ceramic and polymer-based biocompatible materials, nanoceramics and nanoceramic composites, and tribology of advanced materials. Additionally, he has received the Coble Award of the American Ceramic Society in 2008 and was recognized by the Indian National Science Academy and the Indian National Academy of Engineering. Bikramjit Basu has co-authored several titles for Wiley-ACerS including: Tribology of Ceramics and Composites: Materials Science Perspective, Advanced Biomaterials: Fundamentals, Processing, and Applications, and, Advanced Structural Ceramics.

You can read more about the prize and previous winners in Angewandte ChemieVolume 51, Issue 50.

Did you win an award this year? If so, let us know… we’d love to spotlight you!